How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe

How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe

A story of a son searching for his father . . . through quantum space–time.
 
Minor Universe 31 is a vast story-space on the outskirts of fiction, where paradox fluctuates like the stock market, lonely sexbots beckon failed protagonists, and time travel is serious business. Every day, people get into time machines and try to do the one thing they should never do: change the past. That’s where Charles Yu, time travel technician—part counselor, part gadget repair man—steps in. He helps save people from themselves. Literally. When he’s not taking client calls or consoling his boss, Phil, who could really use an upgrade, Yu visits his mother (stuck in a one-hour cycle of time, she makes dinner over and over and over) and searches for his father, who invented time travel and then vanished. Accompanied by TAMMY, an operating system with low self-esteem, and Ed, a nonexistent but ontologically valid dog, Yu sets out, and back, and beyond, in order to find the one day where he and his father can meet in memory. He learns that the key may be found in a book he got from his future self. It’s called How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe, and he’s the author. And somewhere inside it is the information that could help him—in fact it may even save his life.

Title:How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780307379207
Format Type:

    How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe Reviews

  • Stephen

    Another example of high concept literary fiction costuming itself in the tropes, set designs and jargon of genre fiction, while striving to create something unique, penetrating and memorable.And, i...

  • Kemper

    If anyone is ever crazy enough to make a movie version of this, they better hire Charlie Kaufman to do the adapted screenplay. Even he would probably be left scratching his head and saying, “What th...

  • Richard Derus

    Rating: 0.125* of fiveThe Publisher Says: National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 Award winner Charles Yu delivers his debut novel, a razor-sharp, ridiculously funny, and utterly touching story of a son s...

  • Megan Baxter

    I wanted to like this book a great deal more than I did. I wanted to be moved. But in the end, it left me a little cold.I enjoyed the premise, the set up, the notion of living already in a science fic...

  • Frank Eldritch

    Enter the following data:META (search for definition)SCIENCE FICTION (search for definition)TIME TRAVEL (search for definition)Computing...Trajectory locked.To find the only way to exit a time loop, p...

  • Tom Quinn

    This book is a five-star idea with a three-star execution, so I've decided to average it out to 4 stars overall. Despite the plot's faults (it rushes a bit here, it drags a bit there, it's sometimes m...

  • Amy

    There went 237 pages of my life that I'll never get back. Luckily, I don't live in a science fictional universe. I was really expecting something great with all the hype. And the premise of the book s...

  • Sarah

    This book, which I misunderstood as something I might enjoy as light bedtime reading, is perhaps the most original work I've read in the last year. It has the same new-ground-is-broken-here feel that ...

  • nostalgebraist

    Nope. Sorry, Charles Yu. But just -- nope. This doesn't work.The world in which this novel takes place differs from ours in two key respects:1) Humanity has discovered (though it is not made clear whe...

  • Kevin

    The NYTimes blurb compares Yu to Douglas Adams and Philip K. Dick, which is like telling me the book is made of chocolate that cures cancer. So far I think Yu hovers closer to the Dick pole than the A...