Heroes: From Alexander the Great to Mae West

Heroes: From Alexander the Great to Mae West

A galaxy of legendary figures from the annals of Western history comes to life in this stirring sequel to Intellectuals and Creators.
In this enlightening, entertaining work, Paul Johnson continues his engaging history series, approaching the subject of heroism with stirring examples of men and women from every age, walk of life and corner of the world who have inspired and transformed not only their own cultures but the whole world as well.
Heroes includes Samson, Judith and Deborah; Alexander and Julius Caesar; Henry V and Joan of Arc; Thomas More, Lady Jane Grey, Mary Queen of Scots; Elizabeth I and Walter Raleigh; George Washington, the Duke of Wellington and Lord Nelson; Emily Dickinson; Abraham Lincoln and Robert E. Lee; Winston Churchill and Charles de Gaulle; Mae West and Marilyn Monroe; and Ronald Reagan, Margaret Thatcher and Pope John Paul II.

Title:Heroes: From Alexander the Great to Mae West
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780753825747
Format Type:

    Heroes: From Alexander the Great to Mae West Reviews

  • Nickolette

    Interesting because of the subject itself, but I found it chaotic and fragmented and by the last chapter – enraging. After this book, I officially dislike Mr. Johnson on a personal level, and distru...

  • Tom Stamper

    Paul Johnson collects a group of people that you know that he considers heroes and gives an overview of their lives. It's less about what makes a hero, although he goes into it somewhat, and more abou...

  • Brent McGregor

    As a casual read that takes slides of notable people, some great and others just famous, Johnson hits some and misses others. My admiration for men like Henry V and women like Queen Elizabeth has incr...

  • Chrisanne

    A very good collection of some of the best men and women to have walked the earth. I fell in love with Wellington, Lee, and Henry V and the others, for the most part, were quite enjoyable. Johnson nic...

  • Dr G

    This is a fundamentally silly book, really a waste of time. It does not seem to have wasted much of Johnson's time. I suppose it wasted a somewhat smaller quantum of mine, but it hurt me more.Other re...

  • stephanie suh

    In our paradoxical culture of hero-worshipping and anti-hero admiring, the idea of heroism seems to belong to an antediluvian ethos of the misty past when heroic mortals became divine immortals enshri...

  • Robert Gebhardt

    It was so easy to get annoyed with this book that I was actively trying not to, so I could get more out of it. This book is a collection of some very notable characters, and a couple extremely mediocr...

  • Randhir

    I have given this book 4 stars because I liked the Author's style and description of his heroes. Obviously he has done his home work. My grouse is with his selection of heroes. Some of them are pretty...

  • Alex

    Despite the fact that the author spends a good part of the introduction defining the word 'hero' I'm still not sure that I understand or agree with his definition and if it was up to me, I'm not sure ...

  • Jeff Giddens

    This was an enlightening read, if little more than a collection of short biographies. Johnson's choices are interesting: the Old testament judge Deborah, British rebel leader Boudica, Mae West, in add...