The Bell Jar

The Bell Jar

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The Bell Jar chronicles the crack-up of Esther Greenwood: brilliant, beautiful, enormously talented, and successful, but slowly going under—maybe for the last time. Sylvia Plath masterfully draws the reader into Esther's breakdown with such intensity that Esther's insanity becomes completely real and even rational, as probable and accessible an experience as going to the movies. Such deep penetration into the dark and harrowing corners of the psyche is an extraordinary accomplishment and has made The Bell Jar a haunting American classic.

Title:The Bell Jar
Edition Language:English
ISBN:null
Format Type:

    The Bell Jar Reviews

  • Sammy

    There are many who have read The Bell Jar and absolutely loved it. I am gladly considering myself one of them. I was a little caught of guard when I read a few reviews of The Bell Jar comparing it to ...

  • Madeleine

    I feel like I owe Sylvia Plath an apology. This is a book I actively avoided for years because so many people (namely female classmates who wanted to be perceived as painfully different or terminally ...

  • Scarlet

    There is this scene in Chapter 10 of The Bell Jar where Esther Greenwood decides to write a novel. "My heroine would be myself, only in disguise. She would be called Elaine. Elaine. I counted the le...

  • Ariel

    “I saw my life branching out before me like the green fig tree in the story. From the tip of every branch, like a fat purple fig, a wonderful future beckoned and winked. One fig was a husband and a ...

  • karen

    there once was a girl from the bay statewho tried to read finnegan's wake.it made her so ill,she took loads of pills.james joyce has that knack to frustrate.come to my blog!...

  • Taylor

    I've never shied away from depressing material, but there's a difference between the tone serving the story, and a relentlessly depressing work that goes entirely nowhere. I know it can be viewed as a...

  • Karen

    My dad went mad in the early seventies when my mom filed for divorce and took up with another man after 12 yrs of marriage. He ended up in a place called Glenn Eden here in Michigan and went through a...

  • J.L.   Sutton

    It’s been a number of years since I last read Sylvia Plath’s Bell Jar. What I’d remembered most was how well Plath had established the mood for this story by weaving the electrocutions of Julius...

  • Matthew

    “because wherever I sat—on the deck of a ship or at a street café in Paris or Bangkok—I would be sitting under the same glass bell jar, stewing in my own sour air.”― Sylvia Plath, The Bell ...

  • Florencia

    I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us. If the book we are reading doesn't wake us up with a blow on the head, what are we reading it for? ...we need the books that af...