The Tin Can Crucible

The Tin Can Crucible

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5-star-rated, , travel-biography, pigeonhole-read, the-pigeonhole-books, the-pigeonhole, non-fiction, 5-star-reads, Autobiography, Nonfiction, Travel

In 1994, a Peace Corps Volunteer named Christopher Davenport travels to Papua New Guinea’s Eastern Highlands region to live with a group of subsistence farmers.

He settles into village life, begins learning the language and develops a strong sense of connection with his inherited family.

One day, following the death of a venerated elder, the people of the village kidnap, torture, and ultimately kill a local woman accused of practising sorcery.

Devastated, Christopher tries desperately to reconcile this unspeakable act with the welcoming and nurturing community he has come to love. But in trying to comprehend what he has witnessed through the lens of Western sensibilities, Christopher is unable to find the answers he seeks.

Instead, he is left with one universal question: How do we continue to love someone who has done the unthinkable?

In this moving true story, Christopher Davenport gives a considerate but courageously honest depiction of his transformative experience. He asks difficult questions about the role of philanthropy in the intersection of cultures and the mutability of human virtue. He also looks internally to question the integrity of his own well-intended pilgrimage. The result is a sweeping account of grief, empathy, and the complex mechanisms of humanity.

Title:The Tin Can Crucible
ISBN:9781839012198
Format Type:

    The Tin Can Crucible Reviews

  • Pheadra

    This is a beautifully written memoir of author Christopher Davenport's time in Papua New Guinea as part of the Peace Corps. The title immediately reminded me of The Crucible by Arthur Miller and ther...

  • Mandy

    In 1994 Peace Corps volunteer Christopher Davenport embarked on an adventure to the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea where he lived in a village of farmers who welcomed him and with whom he built...

  • Mags

    On one hand this is a fascinating look at a culture that is probably not familiar with most of the Western world. Christopher Davenport was embedded with a Papua New Guinean family and learns their la...

  • Catalina

    I've said this before, but I really, really enjoy reading memoirs by people we cannot label as "famous". I find this type of memoirs wholesome, rich and dripping with emotions; at times even inspiring...

  • Eric Atkisson

    I can't remember the last time I read a book that moved me as much as this one did. It's an amazing, beautifully written story of a transformative experience in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea that ...

  • Charmaine Saliba

    Loved it! This book is about the author's experience in a village in New Papua Guinea. An experience that had an impact on him. thanks to this book I learned about the culture of this place. Also ther...

  • Marianne

    Christopher Davenport comes from Green Bay in the Mid-West USA, to visit the Eastern Highlands in Papua New Guinea as part of a Peace Corps Volunteers group in 1994.His purpose is to become a teacher ...

  • Shelagh Wadman

    The author of The Tin Can Crucible, Christopher Davenport, writes about his time as a Peace Corps volunteer in Papua New Guinea In the 1990’s. It has taken him twenty years to put pen to paper and w...

  • Mags

    On one hand this is a fascinating look at a culture that is probably not familiar with most of the Western world. Christopher Davenport was embedded with a Papua New Guinean family and learns their la...

  • Lucy-Bookworm

    This is a beautifully written autobiographical tale of a short time that the author spent in Papua New Guinea in the early 1990s when he was a young man serving with the Peace Corps. Whilst there he s...