Imperial Eyes: Studies in Travel Writing and Transculturation

Imperial Eyes: Studies in Travel Writing and Transculturation

by

literarycriticism, , home-grad-schooling, american-lit, post-colonial, linguistics, 2013, non-fiction, cultural-studies, Nonfiction, History, Travel, Academic, Anthropology, Criticism, Philosophy, Culture

Studies in colonial and exploration discourse have identified the enormous significance of travel writing as an ideological apparatus of Empire. The study of travel writing has, however, tended to remain either naively celebratory, or dismissive, treating texts as symptoms of imperial ideologies.

Imperial Eyes explores European travel and exploration writing, in conjunction with European economic and political expansion since 1700. It is both a study in the genre and a critique of an ideology. Pratt examines how travel books by Europeans create the domestic subject of European imperialism, and how they engage metropolitan reading publics with expansionist enterprises whose material benefits accrued mainly to the very few. These questions are addressed through readings of travel accounts connected with particular sentimental historical travel writing. It examines the links with abolitionist rhetoric; discursive reinventions of South America during the period of its independence (1800-1840); and 18th-century European writings on Southern Africa in the context of inland expansion.

Title:Imperial Eyes: Studies in Travel Writing and Transculturation
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780415060950
Format Type:

    Imperial Eyes: Studies in Travel Writing and Transculturation Reviews

  • sdw

    Pratt examines the intersections between travel writing and empire. She examines how the ideals of natural history both developed with the expansion of empire and then contributed to a travel writing ...

  • Ameya Warde

    This is by far the densest book I have ever read, but it is so perfectly relevant to my academic interests that I'm going to be buying my own copy ASAP so I can re-read it again with a highlighter in ...

  • Michael

    Since the publication of The Travels of Marco Polo in the early fourteenth century, European adventurers, explorers, tourists, and scientists have traversed other parts of the world and written accoun...

  • Montse Montes de Oca

    Me enseñó muchísimo sobre literatura de viajes y los cambios en sus tópicos que no han desparecido contrario a lo que podríamos esperar.Yo llegué a este libro buscando ejemplos de cómo era la r...

  • Leif

    Few scholarly studies achieve a stance that is both critical and impartial -- to do so, one must allow the texts studied to speak largely for themselves: allowing them the rope to hang themselves, as ...

  • Michelle Boyer-Kelly

    While reading Imperial Eyes, my background in American Indian Studies led me to continue to question how, and when, travelers and explorers are representing Indigenous peoples. Since the narratives di...

  • Kris Rafferty

    Should be required reading. Exhaustive study on a niche issue that changed the world....

  • Emily

    Awesome book. I learned so much more than I can say from it. I constantly reference/think about this book in daily life and school. Great commentary on how the world is based on a fairly "western" Eur...

  • Aaron

    Beautiful ironic prose, biting analysis. The second edition, which I read, has a good postscript of the world from 2007, where the normative state of immobility can no longer be assumed. ...

  • Tasha Swinney

    Dense but insightful. Pratt provides the terms that critical writers of travel narratives will employ for years to come. "Anti-Conquest" and "seeing-man" to name a few. ...