Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime

Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime

Caltech physicist and New York Times bestselling author Sean Carroll shows that there are multiple copies of you. And everyone else. Really.

Something Deeply Hidden begins with the news that physics is in a crisis. Quantum mechanics underlies all of modern physics but major gaps in the theory have been ignored since 1927. Science popularizers keep telling us how weird it is, how contradictory, how impossible it is to understand. Academics discourage students from working on the "dead end" of quantum foundations. Putting his professional reputation on the line, Carroll says that crisis can now come to an end. We just have to accept that there is more than one of us in the universe. There are many, many Sean Carrolls. Many of every one of us.

The Many Worlds Theory of quantum behavior says that every time there is a quantum event, a world splits off with everything in it the same, except in that other world the quantum event didn't happen. As you read this, you are splitting into multiple copies of yourself thousands of times per second. Step-by-step in Carroll's uniquely lucid way, he sets out the major objections to this utterly mind-blowing notion until his case is inescapably established.

The holy grail of modern physics is reconciling quantum mechanics with Einstein's general relativity—his theory of curved spacetime. Carroll argues that our refusal to face up to the mysteries of quantum mechanics has blinded us, and that spacetime and gravity naturally emerge from a deeper reality called the wave function. No book for a popular audience has attempted to make this radical argument. We're on the threshold of a new way of understanding the cosmos.

Title:Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9781524743017
Format Type:

    Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime Reviews

  • Manuel Anto

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.Pascal's Triangle: "Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime" by Sean Carroll“When a spin is measured, the ...

  • BlackOxford

    Scientific RevelationThere is more than a hint of theological method in modern physics. Carroll confirms this in his insistence that quantum physics is, in his words, not an ‘epistemic’ but an ‘...

  • Peter Mcloughlin

    This book puts up an intellectual defense of the many-worlds interpretation of Quantum Mechanics first proposed by Hugh Everett III in 1957. I was sold on this interpretation a long time ago but I lik...

  • Eric

    TL;DR Sean Carroll’s Something Deeply Hidden tackles the difficult many worlds theories of quantum mechanics. It’s weird; it’s funny; it’s deeply philosophical and worth reading. Highly recom...

  • Gary  Beauregard Bottomley

    Do not multiple entities unnecessarily. The Copenhagen Interpretation necessitates the additional entity of an observer or a detection device, take away that added entity you will have the world descr...

  • Peter Tillman

    Nature's review: https://www.nature.com/articles/d4158...Sample:Six decades on, the theory is one of the most bizarre yet fully logical ideas in human history, growing directly out of the fundamental ...

  • Paperclippe

    This was definitely one of Carroll's more technical works. While his language as always as simple as it can be for the layman, there's only a certainly level of simplicity to which quantum theory can ...

  • Realms & Robots

    Something Deeply Hidden is that rare science nonfiction book that’s both easy to understand and incredibly complex. This is quantum mechanics like you’ve never seen, laid out in an understandable ...

  • Thomas Ray

    Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime, Sean Carroll, 2019, 347pp, ISBN 9781524743017 Dewey 530.12The author is physicist Sean M. Carroll, b. 1966, https://en.m.wikiped...

  • Nilesh

    Something Deeply Hidden is a difficult book. I had to go through it twice back to back to understand only a small fraction of all that it tries to teach and convey. Only the first two paragraphs below...