The Art of Statistics: How to Learn from Data

The Art of Statistics: How to Learn from Data

The definitive guide to statistical thinking


Statistics are everywhere, as integral to science as they are to business, and in the popular media hundreds of times a day. In this age of big data, a basic grasp of statistical literacy is more important than ever if we want to separate the fact from the fiction, the ostentatious embellishments from the raw evidence -- and even more so if we hope to participate in the future, rather than being simple bystanders.


In The Art of Statistics, world-renowned statistician David Spiegelhalter shows readers how to derive knowledge from raw data by focusing on the concepts and connections behind the math. Drawing on real world examples to introduce complex issues, he shows us how statistics can help us determine the luckiest passenger on the Titanic, whether a notorious serial killer could have been caught earlier, and if screening for ovarian cancer is beneficial. The Art of Statistics not only shows us how mathematicians have used statistical science to solve these problems -- it teaches us how we too can think like statisticians. We learn how to clarify our questions, assumptions, and expectations when approaching a problem, and -- perhaps even more importantly -- we learn how to responsibly interpret the answers we receive.


Combining the incomparable insight of an expert with the playful enthusiasm of an aficionado, The Art of Statistics is the definitive guide to stats that every modern person needs.

Title:The Art of Statistics: How to Learn from Data
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9781541618510
Format Type:

    The Art of Statistics: How to Learn from Data Reviews

  • Tim Roast

    When I am not writing witty and informative reviews on Goodreads/Amazon my day job is as a Government statistician. Therefore when offered the opportunity to read this book I thought it would be usefu...

  • Vuk Trifkovic

    Pretty good, but there are a few chapters where the author basically goes "I'm not explaining this very well, but I know you won't get it so let's just move on". I also wish there were a few more "dig...

  • Vysloczil

    This amazing piece can somewhat be seen as the equivalent of Angrist&Pischke's "Mastering Metrics" for bread and butter statistical problems instead of intuitive econometrics. It covers everything one...

  • Bari Dzomba

    I didn't like the first 60% of the book. It was too dumbed down even for me and not enough original storytelling for explaininf concepts to non math students. I even gave this feedback to the author. ...

  • Emil O. W. Kirkegaard

    Very nice overall, not much algebra but focus on the reasoning behind, interesting examples. Good for nonscientists....

  • Moh. Nasiri

    Statisticians study patterns in data to help us answer questions about the world. When reported accurately, statistical research can enrich storytelling and inform the public about important issues. U...

  • ?Misericordia? ?????? ????

    Q:A classic example of how alternative framing can change the emotional impact of a number is an advertisement that appeared on the London Underground in 2011, proclaiming that ‘99% of young Londone...

  • Florian

    I really wanted to like this book. But at times it felt like it’s trying to cover too much ground and a lot of it not deep enough. Often times more technical details would have aided proper understa...

  • Daniel B-G

    I never really got statistics when I did Maths when I was younger. The most esoteric parts of pure maths were a breeze, but statistics never clicked, in large part because nobody was able to explain t...

  • James Miller

    I read a lot of pop-maths books and enjoy them (Hannah Fry, Du Sautoy, Simon Singh, and pervious books by Spiegelhalter). This one is a bit more chewy. Where Sex by Numbers uses statistics to tell you...