The Oldest Student: How Mary Walker Learned to Read

The Oldest Student: How Mary Walker Learned to Read

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In 1848, Mary Walker was born into slavery. At age 15, she was freed, and by age 20, she was married and had her first child. By age 68, she had worked numerous jobs, including cooking, cleaning, babysitting, and selling sandwiches to raise money for her church. At 114, she was the last remaining member of her family. And at 116, she learned to read. From Rita Lorraine Hubbard and rising star Oge Mora comes the inspirational story of Mary Walker, a woman whose long life spanned from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement, and who--with perseverance and dedication--proved that you're never too old to learn.

Title:The Oldest Student: How Mary Walker Learned to Read
Edition Language:English
ISBN:null
Format Type:

    The Oldest Student: How Mary Walker Learned to Read Reviews

  • Calista

    I find this story inspirational. May walker was born a slave in 1848 and freed when she was 15. She worked hard during her life, but she never learned to read. She grew her family up and they all died...

  • Dave Schaafsma

    Each year my family reads all the Goodreads-award-nominated picture books. The Oldest Student is book #2 (of 20) of 2020."To know things, for us to know things, is bad for them. We get to wanting and ...

  • Julie

    A truly moving story about Mary Walker finally achieving her lifelong dream to learn to read at age 116! Then, three years later she experienced her first airplane ride and "Mary decided that flying w...

  • Deborah

    It’s never to late to learn how to read. Mary Walker was born a slave in Alabama in 1848. She was freed at 15, married at 20, had three boys, twice widowed, and by 114 she had outlived her husbands ...

  • Sandy Brehl

    It is always inspiring to read authentic stories about overcoming illiteracy, about fulfilling a lifelong will to read. This true story of Mary Walker, born enslaved in 1848, has many gaps in her long...

  • Vivian Kirkfield

    Fabulous text combines with wonderful illustrations that will engage, educate, entertain...and most of all, inspire every child who reads this book! I am almost 73 years old, and I want to be Mary Wal...

  • Rod Brown

    Annual Goodreads Choice Awards reading project: Read all the Picture Book nominees! (20 of 20). Project complete!The story is a bit flat on the page, but the heart of it is quite inspiring as a Black ...

  • Abigail

    Born into slavery in 1848 and freed at the age of fifteen, Mary Walker had always wanted to learn to read - something she associated with the freedom of flight. But the hard circumstances of her life ...

  • Amy Layton

    All I can say is wow, and thank you to Hubbard and Mora for enlightening me on this student!  Learning to read is no easy feat, and even less easy when you get older.  So the fact that Mary Walker ...

  • Ms. B

    You're never too old to learn something new in this picture book for all ages. Mary Walker learned at 116!...