Look Alive Out There

Look Alive Out There

From the New York Times-bestselling author Sloane Crosley comes Look Alive Out There―a brand-new collection of essays filled with her trademark hilarity, wit, and charm. The characteristic heart and punch-packing observations are back, but with a newfound coat of maturity. A thin coat. More of a blazer, really.

Fans of I Was Told There'd Be Cake and How Did You Get This Number know Sloane Crosley's life as a series of relatable but madcap misadventures. In Look Alive Out There, whether it's scaling active volcanoes, crashing shivas, playing herself on Gossip Girl, befriending swingers, or staring down the barrel of the fertility gun, Crosley continues to rise to the occasion with unmatchable nerve and electric one-liners. And as her subjects become more serious, her essays deliver not just laughs but lasting emotional heft and insight. Crosley has taken up the gauntlets thrown by her predecessors―Dorothy Parker, Nora Ephron, David Sedaris―and crafted something rare, affecting, and true.

Look Alive Out There arrives on the tenth anniversary of I Was Told There'd be Cake, and Crosley's essays have managed to grow simultaneously more sophisticated and even funnier. And yet she's still very much herself, and it's great to have her back―and not a moment too soon (or late, for that matter).

Title:Look Alive Out There
ISBN:null
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    Look Alive Out There Reviews

  • Jill

    I didn't finish this one after losing steam halfway through. Crosley is an enjoyable narrator, but there were enough too-perfect details in a situation that I questioned how "real" everything was (I d...

  • Jamie Bernard

    I’ve loved Sloane Crosley for a long time. She has a snarky wit about her that is unrivaled. I’m just not sure what to make of this collection of essays. Some were amazing. I especially enjoyed re...

  • Scott

    I was completely unfamiliar with Ms. Crosley or her previous collections of essays, but I kept seeing Look Alive Out There on the library's new release non-fic shelf so I decided to take a chance on i...

  • Gretchen Rubin

    I love essays, and I heard a great interview with Sloane Crosley on the Longform podcast so wanted to read this collection. I'd read her earlier book, I Was Told There'd Be Cake. I rarely make observa...

  • Amy

    Mostly enjoyable. A full star off for a particularly gross essay in which Crosley goes to Ecuador to climb a volcano she's done exactly zero research on and has done no prep for, and of course she nee...

  • Jerrie (redwritinghood)

    I’m not sure that these are essays - more like anecdotes from someone who makes stupid mistakes and then uses self-deprecating humor to get everyone to laugh about it. There are some insights here a...

  • ns510

    I like my essays more incisive than these, which felt more like hanging out with a hilarious friend as she shares her stories with you. There were some moments of insight, and others where her privile...

  • Kathleen

    Crosley’s essays have been compared to David Sedaris. I don’t see it! True, they are both a little bit neurotic and keen observers of the foibles of others, but Crosley just seems to be a little t...

  • Edward Lorn

    If any of these stories actually happened I'll eat a roll of quarters and shit you arcade tokens....

  • Liza Fireman

    This book was fine, but not that funny. The essays were uneven, and many were quite flat. I am not a huge fan of humor books, and it needs to have a special flavor for me to love them. A few that I lo...