The Judas Rose

The Judas Rose

An instant cult classic upon first publication, Suzette Haden Elgin's Native Tongue trilogy has earned wide critical acclaim, shocking and captivating a loyal readership among science fiction and women's literature audiences alike.

Sequel to the enormously popular Native Tongue, The Judas Rose continues Elgin's gripping vision of a frightening, male-dominated world where the women of Earth are virtually enslaved. Once again, this group of women—and the nonviolent yet transformative power of language—is called upon to challenge Earth's violent, patriarchal order. Their revolutionary tool is Laadan—a secret women's language created to free them from men's control and make resistance possible for all women.

In The Judas Rose, the time has come to take Laadan from underground and spread its revolutionary power to women everywhere—in part, through a group of nuns inside the Roman Catholic Church. But when a handful of horrified priests uncover the women's sabotage they move to stamp it out with an undercover female agent of their own.

Title:The Judas Rose
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9781558614031
Format Type:

    The Judas Rose Reviews

  • Denise

    This title manages to avoid a lot of standard middle-book-in-the-trilogy problems, and is eminently readable and enjoyable; it's very entertaining, and good to settle down in. If I have any particular...

  • Megan Bell

    In a future America where women have no legal rights, aliens are major economic players, and linguists are in high demand, the women of the Lines (the 13 linguist families) infiltrate the Catholic Chu...

  • p

    What SHE got right in the first book, she got wrong in the second.It is still the same white feminist speculative fiction. However, plot setup and world development are distorted to some self-contradi...

  • Erin

    This book was actually easier to read than the last one—and that wasn't so much a matter of it being written any differently as it was of simply already being acclimated to the author's writing styl...

  • IVellon

    Unfortunatly, this was not as good as the first part by far...First I feared that all the new characters were just reincarnations of part 1 characters, but luckely this did not turn out to be true at ...

  • Blythe

    Excellent sequel to the first, with all new interesting characters and a solid progression from where the first left off. Much more to do with religion and a deeper investigation into the relationship...

  • Riah

    This book was not as strong as the first in the trilogy, in large part because the story spent much more time on the government men and the nuns and priests than it did on the linguists. Towards the m...

  • William Walter

    A continuation of the story with its frightening premise, developing into a fully fleshed-out dystopian tale through this volume--discouragingly not so far from our current state of affairs. Elgin see...

  • Nev Bezaire

    felt like a middle book of a trilogy, but while that means this book lacks it's own beginning-middle-end it did not mean it's not a great middle to the whole trilogy...

  • Rainbowgardener

    See my review of Native Tongue, the first in this trilogy. All the same applies here, except the sequel isn't as good and the holes and flaws are more apparent....