The Sin of Certainty: Why God Desires Our Trust More Than Our

The Sin of Certainty: Why God Desires Our Trust More Than Our "Correct" Beliefs

The controversial evangelical Bible scholar and author of The Bible Tells Me So explains how Christians mistake “certainty” and “correct belief” for faith when what God really desires is trust and intimacy.

With compelling and often humorous stories from his own life, Bible scholar Peter Enns offers a fresh look at how Christian life truly works, answering questions that cannot be addressed by the idealized traditional doctrine of “once for all delivered to the saints.”

Enns offers a model of vibrant faith that views skepticism not as a loss of belief, but as an opportunity to deepen religious conviction with courage and confidence. This is not just an intellectual conviction, he contends, but a more profound kind of knowing that only true faith can provide.

Combining Enns’ reflections of his own spiritual journey with an examination of Scripture, The Sin of Certainty models an acceptance of mystery and paradox that all believers can follow and why God prefers this path because it is only this way by which we can become mature disciples who truly trust God. It gives Christians who have known only the demand for certainty permission to view faith on their own flawed, uncertain, yet heartfelt, terms.

Title:The Sin of Certainty: Why God Desires Our Trust More Than Our "Correct" Beliefs
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780062272089
Format Type:

    The Sin of Certainty: Why God Desires Our Trust More Than Our "Correct" Beliefs Reviews

  • Rod Horncastle

    This is indeed the most useless piece of Liberal/emotional theological Crap I have ever been submerged in. This book actually caused me to quit my church (of 21 years - Bye bye Wesleyan Methodist theo...

  • Adam Shields

    Short Review: I think that this is a book that is going to be misread by many and left unread by many more because of the title. The main theme is that the role of the church and of us as Christians i...

  • Emily

    "...life has all sorts of everyday and ordinary ways of upsetting our thinking about our faith. I believe that, in these moments, God invites us to deepen and grow in our relationship with and our und...

  • Kiel

    Asked a lot of good questions, and in my opinion gave a lot of bad answers. I guess if the goal is put a damper on certainty that's what you do. I agree with Enns that there are problems in American C...

  • BHodges

    Peter Enns offers here a confessional book about how he came to understand belief and faith more in terms of trust and love than in terms of facts and knowledge. Many Christians place being "correct" ...

  • Robert D. Cornwall

    Several years back a noted evangelical Bible scholar was forced to resign from his teaching position at a conservative but fairly well-regarded evangelical seminary. Apparently a book he published did...

  • Greg Diehl

    I simply cannot recommend this book enough, particularly to anyone who has participated for any amount of time in a religious community that all too often places a premium on the language of certainty...

  • Curtis

    Can it be a coincidence that I always seem to be reading specific books at just the right time I need to hear what they are saying? I doubt it. Peter Enns here sheds light on the problems a reliance o...

  • Jon

    No reason to beat around the bush on this, Peter Enns is a heretic, plain and simple. He’s an engaging and winsome author. He tells a fine story, but that’s it—it’s just a story.From beginning...

  • Bob Schilling

    Better Titled, “The Morass of an Unmoored Life.”This is a book of astonishing unbelief and mockery. I had been nominally aware of Peter Enns and the controversies surrounding him back in 2005 thro...