The Sickness Unto Death: A Christian Psychological Exposition for Upbuilding and Awakening

The Sickness Unto Death: A Christian Psychological Exposition for Upbuilding and Awakening

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A companion piece to The Concept of Anxiety, this work continues Søren Kierkegaard’s radical and comprehensive analysis of human nature in a spectrum of possibilities of existence. Present here is a remarkable combination of the insight of the poet and the contemplation of the philosopher.

In The Sickness unto Death, Kierkegaard moves beyond anxiety on the mental-emotional level to the spiritual level, where — in contact with the eternal — anxiety becomes despair. Both anxiety and despair reflect the misrelation that arises in the self when the elements of the synthesis — the infinite and the finite — do not come into proper relation to each other. Despair is a deeper expression for anxiety and is a mark of the eternal, which is intended to penetrate temporal existence.

Title:The Sickness Unto Death: A Christian Psychological Exposition for Upbuilding and Awakening
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780691020280
Format Type:

    The Sickness Unto Death: A Christian Psychological Exposition for Upbuilding and Awakening Reviews

  • Khashayar Mohammadi

    Kierkegaard is a strange philosopher to discuss. His writing is incredibly dense in ideology while poetically preserving the aesthetic. I bought this book more than two years ago, along with "Fear and...

  • Leonard

    For Kierkegaard, “the self is not the relation (which relates to itself) but the relation’s relating to itself.” From the start, he shifts from a Cartesian or essentialist view of the self to an...

  • B. P. Rinehart

    "...What our age needs is education. And so this is what happened: God chose a man who also needed to be educated, and educated him privatissime, so that he might be able to teach others from his own ...

  • David Sarkies

    Identity in an industrialised world14 October 2013 This book seems to simply ramble on with only a vague structure to it. The reason I say a vague structure is because the first part deals with despai...

  • Justin Evans

    In which I am again reminded of a friend's experience with a professor in a class on Kierkegaard: the students spent the first five weeks trying to convince the professor that you can probably only un...

  • David Withun

    -...

  • Robby

    "The Sickness unto Death" is an insightful taxonomy of human self-deception, and a fascinating polemic supporting a Christianity of individuals, rather than groups. Its two parts, "The Sickness unto D...

  • globulon

    Just read this for the second time. The first time was in college for a Kierkegaard class. I liked it then a lot, but one of the problems with college for me was that I often felt overloaded. There wa...

  • Ka?yap

    This can be called a Phenomenology of Despair. Kierkegaard is frequently considered as anti-Hegel but this book can be considered as a kind of dialectic of the self. Kierkegaard looked at the self the...

  • ana

    kierkegaard is an anxious danish twink with self-esteem issues and we love him for it...