A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War: How J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis Rediscovered Faith, Friendship, and Heroism in the Cataclysm of 1914-18

A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War: How J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis Rediscovered Faith, Friendship, and Heroism in the Cataclysm of 1914-18

The untold story of how the First World War shaped the lives, faith, and writings of J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis

The First World War laid waste to a continent and permanently altered the political and religious landscape of the West. For a generation of men and women, it brought the end of innocence—and the end of faith. Yet for J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis, the Great War deepened their spiritual quest. Both men served as soldiers on the Western Front, survived the trenches, and used the experience of that conflict to ignite their Christian imagination. Had there been no Great War, there would have been no Hobbit, no Lord of the Rings, no Narnia, and perhaps no conversion to Christianity by C. S. Lewis.

Unlike a generation of young writers who lost faith in the God of the Bible, Tolkien and Lewis produced epic stories infused with the themes of guilt and grace, sorrow and consolation. Giving an unabashedly Christian vision of hope in a world tortured by doubt and disillusionment, the two writers created works that changed the course of literature and shaped the faith of millions. This is the first book to explore their work in light of the spiritual crisis sparked by the conflict.

Title:A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War: How J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis Rediscovered Faith, Friendship, and Heroism in the Cataclysm of 1914-18
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780718021764
Format Type:

    A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War: How J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis Rediscovered Faith, Friendship, and Heroism in the Cataclysm of 1914-18 Reviews

  • Trish

    This book was supposed to explain the relationship between WWI and the origin of Tolkien's and Lewis' most famous works, The Lord of the Rings and The Chronicles of Narnia. It only succeeded somewhat....

  • Susan

    This is a fascinating look at the experiences of two young men in WWI and how it affected their writing, their faith and their spiritual quest. J.R.R.Tolkien and C.S.Lewis first met at Oxford in 1926,...

  • Matt

    A good book, but a number of flaws keep this from being a truly great book.The first is that there is simply not enough material about the war time experiences of Tolkien and Lewis to form the basis o...

  • happy

    With this book, Professor Loconte, looks at the friendship between C.S. Lewis and J.R.R Tolkien, how their experience in the Great War influenced their masterpieces and as a bonus how the ideals of th...

  • Cindy Rollins

    Many years ago I fell down the WWI rabbit hole and I still wander there frequently. Recently I took another plunge with A World Undone by G.J. Meyer and this excellent little book. This book referred ...

  • Tom

    The Great War shattered the complacency of the West. Flanders’ Fields exploded the myth of Progress, that strange concatenation of Technological and Social Darwinism, of Social Gospel and Hard Scien...

  • Cori

    With the exception of the Bible, no book(s) has impacted my life like The Lord of the Rings trilogy and the seven books of the Narnia series. C.S. Lewis had a strong stance on stories- fantasy in part...

  • Laura

    I'll admit I know shockingly little about WWI. Like many a teenage girl, I went through a season where I read all the WWII fiction I could get my hands on but I never was all that interested in comple...

  • Jordan

    For a certain group, JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis are such a part of the literary, imaginative, and spiritual landscape that their insights are taken for granted. The timeless qualities of their work have...

  • Barb Middleton

    I've read bundles of fiction and nonfiction books on World War II, but not World War I. How did fascism, Nazism, communism, and eugenics take root after WWI? Why did people support narcissistic leader...