The Flying Saucers Are Real

The Flying Saucers Are Real

The Flying Saucers Are Real investigates numerous encounters between people, including fighter pilots, & UFOs. Keyhoe states that while Earth has been visited by extraterrestrials for centuries, the Air Force was actively investigating these cases & hiding them. He researched sightings, concluding the saucers are interplanetary. Keyhow, who had some access to original military files, didn't believe in space visitors before starting this book. He examines the most prominent UFO cases up to 1950: the Kenneth Arnold sighting, the Mantell Crash, the Chiles-Whitted UFO sighting etc, offering his own views. After checking every other possible answer thoroughly, he saw that they didn't fit with the reports. This is a must for anyone who wants to know the truth about UFO phenomena. It wasn't only one of the 1st, but also one of the best reports ever written on the subject. There is no sensationalism in its pages, just cold, hard, well-researched facts. Keyhoe was one of the most prominent figures in the early history & development of UFO studies in the USA. His book established him as a leading figure in the field. Over the next two decades he'd be frequently interviewed on tv & radio. In '57 he became the leader of NICAP (National Investigations Committee on Aerial Phenomena), the largest, most influential civilian UFO research group of the '50s & 60s. He remained its leader until 1969.

Title:The Flying Saucers Are Real
Edition Language:English
ISBN:null
Format Type:

    The Flying Saucers Are Real Reviews

  • Dina

    It's an interesting analysis but you should read for yourself and make your own conclusion. The main premise is that another highly advanced civilization(s) had been watching us for a while and ever s...

  • dragonhelmuk

    Kindled for free: Apparently one of the first modern books in the UFO genre. I'm not sure how many other books I've read from this time period (around the 1940s/50s) and it is an odd era to be sure. O...

  • Eric

    This is one of the first big books in ufology. It came out in 1950, only a couple of years into the UFO craze. It focuses on a few key sightings most of which are still considered to be classic UFO en...

  • Nick Pascalli

    I will start by saying, in the end I was ultimately convinced that the reported sightings were genuine UFOs. That being said, I did not get truly convinced until about the final 4 chapters or so. Actu...

  • Heidi

    I can only say one thing...I've always suspected, I've figured the government and/or military knew more than they let on, etc. But until I read this book, there was that niggling, pervasive, subconsci...

  • Maarten Naple

    It's a shame conspiracy theories lead to so much suffering since they are so entertaining. Loved it, some of it sounds fairly convincing all things considered. What this book does do accurately is giv...

  • Strong Extraordinary Dreams

    Poorly written, and by a journalist The attempts at narrative "Once in the car, David exclaimed. . ." are just painfulStill, a convincing text: it's always the lies that lead to the truth, in this cas...

  • Aleksandr Lazarev

    This book gives no any useful information, neither hold any poetic value. Summary:Maybe they are real maybe not - who knows? Government hides something from us......

  • Craig

    InformativeThe book is informative and entertaining. However there are grammatical errors as well as incomplete sentences. That's why I can't give a higher star count....

  • Simon

    Old books about UFOs and the paranormal in general are always fun: Sometimes for the unintentional humour, sometimes because they have genuinely interesting theories but sometimes also for how much of...