Finite and Infinite Games: A Vision of Life as Play and Possibility

Finite and Infinite Games: A Vision of Life as Play and Possibility

An extraordinary book that will dramatically change the way you experience life.
Finite games are the familiar contests of everyday life, the games we play in business and politics, in the bedroom and on the battlefied -- games with winners and losers, a beginning and an end. Infinite games are more mysterious -- and ultimately more rewarding. They are unscripted and unpredictable; they are the source of true freedom.
In this elegant and compelling work, James Carse explores what these games mean, and what they can mean to you. He offers stunning new insights into the nature of property and power, of culture and community, of sexuality and self-discovery, opening the door to a world of infinite delight and possibility.
"An extraordinary little book . . . a wise and intimate companion, an elegant reminder of the real."
-- Brain/Mind Bulletin

Title:Finite and Infinite Games: A Vision of Life as Play and Possibility
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780345341846
Format Type:

    Finite and Infinite Games: A Vision of Life as Play and Possibility Reviews

  • Rob

    amazing. amazing!one of those books that doesn't really teach you anything, but page after page you want to shout, "yes!, that's what i've always known, but i never had the words!". hard to summarize,...

  • Wai Yip Tung

    "There are at least two kinds of games. One could be called finite, the other infinite. A finite game is played for the purpose of winning, an infinite game for the purpose of continuing the play."Thi...

  • Architeacher

    I bought this book in 1986 and tried to read it, but without much success. It lay on a bookshelf for fifteen years until one sleepless night when I picked it up and thought to try again. I swallowed i...

  • Brian

    (1.5) Found it vapidSo at least one reviewer said you needed to be 'intellectual' enough to really get this book. Well, I guess I'm unintellectual cause I really didn't. It was a sequence of unconnect...

  • Showmeguy

    This is a litmus test kind of a book. It appeals only to a certain kind of a person (me and others like me who are strongly intellectual in orientation). If you are stopped in your tracks by a sentenc...

  • Philippe

    I grant this book five stars for the brilliance of its core idea. The distinction between finite games and an infinite game is heuristically so powerful that once one has grasped it, it is almost impo...

  • Kinga

    This is why everyone hates moral philosophy professors. Except this guy isn't even one. He has all the arrogance of one but none of their intellectual rigour. This book has all the impracticality of a...

  • Richard

    Despite my middling evaluation, I do recommend Carse’s book for anyone curious about it.I stumbled on this title while listening to Ezra Klein’s podcast. It seemed like there were quite a few sequ...

  • Jonathan

    Some good stuff buried under a lot of messy writing and incoherent thought. Logical inconsistencies abound. I think his main problems come with infinite games - his rhetorical structure means he must ...

  • DJ

    "Play" has saddled up alongside "innovation", "social entrepreneurship", and "network" as a buzzword for the early 21st century. Written decades before, however, Carse's book is a unique and fascinati...