Natural Justice

Natural Justice

This book lays out foundations for a "science of morals." Binmore uses game theory as a systematic tool for investigating ethical matters. He reinterprets classical social contract ideas within a game-theory framework and generates new insights into the fundamental questions of social philosophy. In contrast to the previous writing in moral philosophy that relied on vague notion such as " societal well-being" and "moral duty," Binmore begins with individuals; rational decision-makers with the ability to empathize with one another. Any social arrangement that prescribes them to act against their interests will become unstable and eventually will be replaced by another, until one is found that includes worthwhile actions for all individuals involved.

Title:Natural Justice
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780195178111
Format Type:

    Natural Justice Reviews

  • Manny

    A few weeks ago, I was chatting with Jen when the subject of the Prisoner's Dilemma came up. Jen said she'd read about this and related cases of the Tragedy of the Commons, where a good result could b...

  • Fin Moorhouse

    "Keep me always at it, and I'll keep you always at it, you keep someone else always at it. There you are with the Whole Duty of Man in a commercial country."– Mr. Pancks, from Dickens' Little Dorrit...

  • Sorina

    All in all, a fascinating book to read for its arguments alone. What Binmore is trying to advocate in the book is a move away from a metaphysical explanation of morality to a scientific one. His thesi...

  • Hoho Ghumpus

    The ideas are brilliant--an attempt to rigorously apply evolutionary theory to social interactions (and thus politics), via the tools of game theory--but much more clearly explicated in the two-volume...

  • Fabian

    I found zero value reading trough 2/3 of the book ... I like the author but think he should stick to Game Theory. ...

  • Hoho Ghumpus

    The ideas are brilliant--an attempt to rigorously apply evolutionary theory to social interactions (and thus politics), via the tools of game theory--but much more clearly explicated in the two-volume...