Why Are All The Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?

Why Are All The Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?

by

, race, nonfiction, own-electronic, reading-with-ld, nonfiction, 300s, summer-reading, sociology, 2019, black-studies, race-culture, necessary-reads, non-fiction, non-fiction, nonfiction, education-professional, nonfiction, books-i-own, Nonfiction, Race, Education, Social Movements, Psychology, Sociology, Teaching, Politics, Cultural

Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see Black, White, and Latino youth clustered in their own groups. Is this self-segregation a problem to address or a coping strategy? Beverly Daniel Tatum, a renowned authority on the psychology of racism, argues that straight talk about our racial identities is essential if we are serious about enabling communication across racial and ethnic divides. These topics have only become more urgent as the national conversation about race is increasingly acrimonious. This fully revised edition is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the dynamics of race in America.

Title:Why Are All The Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780465083619
Format Type:

    Why Are All The Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? Reviews

  • Cheryl Kuhl-paine

    White people: This is not a Racism 101 book. Don't read it if it's your first, second, or even third book on racism. It won't help you. You'll feel attacked and guilty, and write a self-centered, whin...

  • Melanie Russo

    As a caucasion mother of an adopted african american son...this book was a MUST READ. It teaches us how to have effective and constructive conversations about race. Recent generations of caucasions ha...

  • Toe

    Completely awful. Tatum's book is thinly disguised racist propaganda devoid of actual statistics or legitimate quantification of the state of race relations in modern America. Worse than that, it does...

  • Thomas

    An informative book that focuses on Black kids’ racial identity development while also addressing a range of topics including affirmative action, how to have conversations about race, and the racial...

  • Zanna

    I have learned that a sincere, though imperfect attempt to interrupt the oppression of others is usually better than no attempt at allThis is a really useful book for white people as it lays out the 1...

  • Leslie

    This is just AWFUL. She attempts to redefine racism (if you're white, you're racist). Her racial identity theory may hit home (I'm biracial), but it is too narrow. Blacks do not have the monopoly on d...

  • Bonnie

    I was angry pretty much the entire time I was reading this, until the last two chapters about races other than black people, and biracial kids, respectively. I want to have a list of both pros and con...

  • Siri

    Think you're not racist? THINK AGAIN. Hahaha sorry had to write that bc I felt like it was a catchy phrase to get you to read this review. ANYWAY... this gets 5 stars for content, not writing, but the...

  • Sps

    A useful read. When advantaged people claim that since they aren't actively persecuting anyone, they aren't actually on the top of the hierarchy, I want to share Tatum's clear explanations and example...

  • Debs

    I had wanted to read this book since it came out in the late 1990s, because I had often wondered about this very question. I grew up in a Boston suburb that was part of the METCO program, a well-meani...