The Games Do Count: America's Best and Brightest on the Power of Sports

The Games Do Count: America's Best and Brightest on the Power of Sports

by

, play, sports, sports, Sports, Nonfiction

What do Henry Kissinger, Jack Welch, Condoleezza Rice, and Jon Bon Jovi have in common? They have all reached the top of their respective professions, and they all credit sports for teaching them the lessons that were fundamental to their success. In his years spent interviewing and profiling celebrities, politicians, and top businesspeople, popular sportscaster and Fox & Friends cohost Brian Kilmeade has discovered that nearly everyone shares a love of sports and has a story about how a game, a coach, or a single moment of competition changed his or her life.

These vignettes have entertained, surprised, and inspired readers nationwide with their insight into America's most respected and well-known personalities. Kilmeade presents more than seventy stories straight from the men and women themselves and those who were closest to them. From competition to camaraderie, individual achievement to teamwork, failure to success, the world of sports encompasses it all and enriches our lives. The Games Do Count reveals this simple and compelling truth: America's best and brightest haven't just worked hard -- they've played hard -- and the results have been staggering!

Title:The Games Do Count: America's Best and Brightest on the Power of Sports
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9780060736736
Format Type:

    The Games Do Count: America's Best and Brightest on the Power of Sports Reviews

  • Lawrence Kao

    I picked up "The Games Do Count" whilst browsing in the bargain books bin in a Border's in San Francisco. Being a huge sports fan and a relatively recent MBA grad, I really thought this book would be ...

  • Ted Hinkle

    Began reading sometime ago; pulled off shelf recently to continue reading. These vignettes give insight into the influence of sport in a cross section of 74 American leaders and well-known personaliti...

  • Academic Eric

    This may be necessary reading for educators that seem to want to cut out sports. Although I did not grow up with much of this in my earlier education, there seem to be lessons that are best learned wh...

  • Sean

    It's a nice book. The chapters are pretty short and are quick reads.For me, there are too many typos. For instance Tony Danza boxed in the Golden Gloves not the Golden Globes; Dr. J's name is Julius E...

  • Judine

    I've only read 15 or 20 of these profiles, but I like that so many of the people talk about how their participation in sports influenced what they're doing now - and they're doing everything from acti...

  • Ryan

    The people I found interesting had a few nice stories. But, albeit it could be my issue, I didn't care about most of these people. And the ones I wanted to read were super short. An easy book to read ...

  • John Desmond

    A collection of essays written by some of the most famous people in America. They tell the story of how participation in sports influenced their lives, how they applied lessons of teamwork, dedication...

  • Reid Corcoran

    Their stories illustrate what the games are supposed to mean to our kids. NOWHERE in the book does it talk about the importance of the games to the guy pacing the siadelines, veins bulging, living vic...

  • Katie

    The overall intention of this book, to show that sports are an important part of character development, was really appealing to me. I agree that participation in sports helps to shape a person and inf...

  • Dave

    The stories were not that remarkable but it was interesting to see what value sports played in these lives.Same old theme for me... great theme but not that great of a book.The author is one of the an...