Insurrection: To Believe Is Human To Doubt, Divine

Insurrection: To Believe Is Human To Doubt, Divine

In this incendiary new work, the controversial author and speaker Peter Rollins proclaims that the Christian faith is not primarily concerned with questions regarding life after death but with the possibility of life before death.

In order to unearth this truth, Rollins prescribes a radical and wholesale critique of contemporary Christianity that he calls pyro-theology. It is only as we submit our spiritual practices, religious rituals, and dogmatic affirmations to the flames of fearless interrogation that we come into contact with the reality that Christianity is in the business of transforming our world rather than offering a way of interpreting or escaping it. Belief in the Resurrection means but one thing: participation in an Insurrection.

Title:Insurrection: To Believe Is Human To Doubt, Divine
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9781451609004
Format Type:

    Insurrection: To Believe Is Human To Doubt, Divine Reviews

  • Ali M.

    UPDATE: One of my favorite theology bloggers, Richard Beck, wrote up a great critique of Insurrection here. Well worth the read. I agree that Bonhoeffer presents a more consummate vision of etsi deus ...

  • Vegantrav

    Insurrection asks the reader to accept the challenge given by Bonhoeffer: to embrace a religionless Christianity, a Christianity without dogma, a Christianity wherein the philosophical question of God...

  • dp

    I really hate this book. Insurrection cut me to the core - it caused me to experience nearly the full range of human emotions, physical manifestations and all. The doubt mentioned in the title is an u...

  • Mike

    I like books which deal with Christians and doubt. I have come to distrust books that give pat answers and easy formulas for solving insoluble problems. One of my favorite books is Greg Boyd's book "B...

  • David Gregg

    I haven't finished this book. I may. But every time I pick it up I feel like the author is talking to an established audience, not to me. I'm new to Rollins and he seems to me to be using his own voca...

  • David

    Here's the thing: if you've read a bunch of Zizek already, and thought about how it applies to the American church, a lot of this will feel very familiar. A lot of this feels like "Zizek for Churchies...

  • David

    In a manner reminiscent of Pete Enns, Rollins tackles the problematic topic of doubt and belief as it relates to the core tenants of the Christian faith. Is real faith when you believe what you are to...

  • Chet Duke

    I couldn't tear my eyes away from the book, but not necessarily in a good way. Honestly, this felt like an attempt to write something profound, but in the end much of it was "meaningless," a term Roll...

  • John Lucy

    Really, this should have been two separate books. It was recommended to me by a friend who thought that I'd like much of what Rollins has to say. I did agree with much of Part I and found it very intr...

  • Connor

    This book was two hundred pages of whiplash. The things I liked, I loved. The things I didn't like, I hated. The experience was infuriating, but thrilling. I can't say I was bored.Some critiques land ...