The Progress Principle: Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work

The Progress Principle: Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work

What really sets the best managers above the rest? It’s their power to build a cadre of employees who have great inner work lives—consistently positive emotions; strong motivation; and favorable perceptions of the organization, their work, and their colleagues. The worst managers undermine inner work life, often unwittingly.

As Teresa Amabile and Steven Kramer explain in The Progress Principle, seemingly mundane workday events can make or break employees’ inner work lives. But it’s forward momentum in meaningful work—progress—that creates the best inner work lives. Through rigorous analysis of nearly 12,000 diary entries provided by 238 employees in 7 companies, the authors explain how managers can foster progress and enhance inner work life every day.

The book shows how to remove obstacles to progress, including meaningless tasks and toxic relationships. It also explains how to activate two forces that enable progress: (1) catalysts—events that directly facilitate project work, such as clear goals and autonomy—and (2) nourishers—interpersonal events that uplift workers, including encouragement and demonstrations of respect and collegiality.

Brimming with honest examples from the companies studied, The Progress Principle equips aspiring and seasoned leaders alike with the insights they need to maximize their people’s performance.

Title:The Progress Principle: Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9781422198575
Format Type:

    The Progress Principle: Using Small Wins to Ignite Joy, Engagement, and Creativity at Work Reviews

  • Roy Klein

    I've decided to stop reading this book halfway through. The reason is that the book contains a small amount of simplistic advice, almost no practical methods for implementing this advice, and a large ...

  • BuenoBomb aka Andre Bueno

    Good book though I felt it was a bit redundant and long winded.READING NOTESCHAPTER 01Inner work life has to do with how an employee feels about working somewhere and which direction you are shifting ...

  • loafingcactus

    One of the main points of the book is a by-the-way in chapter 8 that isn't even mentioned in the chapter title. What doofs! So here's the deal: work nourishers, catalysts and a sense of progress matte...

  • Fred

    Was prompted to read this book by review by Seth Godin. Primary concepts are pretty much a no brainers once they are explained. I recommend it because it brings light to the common sense we know, but ...

  • Todd

    This book is an amazing example of the dictum do not say in two-hundred pages what you can say in twenty. Alas publishers do not pay very much for twenty pages. Then, what it would say in those twenty...

  • Yevgeniy Brikman

    This book would've been far better as a blog post. It makes several important arguments in the preface and then repeats them over and over again for a few hundred pages, adding only a handful of valua...

  • David Phillips

    This is a great book for leading other people. It helps those leading others to see what really matters to others. It helps focus our efforts at inspiring and motivating others and to help those we le...

  • Amy

    Not bad. It's research, so it takes a while before we get to any practical bits. Once we did get into the meat of it though, there were lots of insights into how managers can cultivate productive work...

  • Melvin

    An enjoyable reading addressing how positive and negative work environments arise and how they affect people's creative problem solving.This book is based on a study conducted in a set of 7 companies ...

  • Scott

    This book is a psychological look at the human side of management. Rather than measuring employees and productivity with simple numbers or behavioral psychology, the authors conducted a survey of empl...