The Ultimate Question 2.0 (Revised and Expanded Edition): How Net Promoter Companies Thrive in a Customer-Driven World

The Ultimate Question 2.0 (Revised and Expanded Edition): How Net Promoter Companies Thrive in a Customer-Driven World

In the first edition of this landmark book, business loyalty guru Fred Reichheld revealed the question most critical to your company’s future: �Would you recommend us to a friend?” By asking customers this question, you identify detractors, who sully your firm’s reputation and readily switch to competitors, and promoters, who generate good profits and true, sustainable growth.

You also generate a vital metric: your Net Promoter Score. Since the book was first published, Net Promoter has transformed companies, across industries and sectors, constituting a game-changing system and ethos that rivals Six Sigma in its power.

In this thoroughly updated and expanded edition, Reichheld, with Bain colleague Rob Markey, explains how practitioners have built Net Promoter into a full-fledged management system that drives extraordinary financial and competitive results. With his trademark clarity, Reichheld:

� Defines the fundamental concept of Net Promoter, explaining its connection to your company’s growth and sustained success
� Presents the closed-loop feedback process and demonstrates its power to energize employees and delight customers
� Shares new and compelling stories of companies that have transformed their performance by putting Net Promoter at the center of their business

Practical and insightful, The Ultimate Question 2.0 provides a blueprint for long-term growth and success.

Title:The Ultimate Question 2.0 (Revised and Expanded Edition): How Net Promoter Companies Thrive in a Customer-Driven World
Edition Language:English
ISBN:9781422173350
Format Type:

    The Ultimate Question 2.0 (Revised and Expanded Edition): How Net Promoter Companies Thrive in a Customer-Driven World Reviews

  • Jw van Eck

    A familiar concept: consulting company does some research, publishes an article, then a book. This one is about the one number* you should monitor whether you and your organisation are behaving custom...

  • ?????? ???????

    I am working in market research field since Seven years, I always said that NPS creator succeeded not in creating the ultimate question but in marketing and promoting that they did so, this book is an...

  • Tanja Berg

    As the company I work for uses NPS (net promoter score), I figured reading a book about it would be useful and fill in some blanks. The "ultimate questions" in customer satisfaction is this: "would yo...

  • Nast Marrero

    It is astonishing to realize how aligned are the leading management innovations nowadays. Agile Frameworks, Lean Six-Sigma, Lean Startup, Customer Development. Reads from these disciplines share many ...

  • Robert Chapman

    I first heard about NPS at an executive meeting at my previous company. Even with the high level explanation given during the presentation I knew it was something I needed to learn more about as it wa...

  • Greg

    A company I had previously worked for started to use NPS which is where I first saw this methodology. This book was recommended reading to get up to speed on the methodology. It seems like there is a ...

  • Anton Iokov

    This is the most controversial book I've read.It is full of marketing bullshit and shallow preaching. It is extremely repetitive and can be easily be shortened twofold or even threefold.There are part...

  • Josh Steimle

    If you're wondering whether you need to read the previous iteration of this book AND this book the answer is no. This book contains everything from the first book and then some, at least as nearly as ...

  • Akshay

    The Net Promoter Score stems from customer loyalty research at Bain. The premise is that in order to collect customer feedback to create a customer-centric organization, one question is sufficient("on...

  • Angela Guedes

    Good concept with valuable ideas, but the book itself was hard to read. Too many chapters talking about the same things, it seemed I was reading the same ideas over and over again. like another reader...